Archive for the violet Category

Anna Sui Perfumes.

Posted in almalfi lemon, bamboo, black currant, floral fruity, mandarin orange, musk, peony, pink pepper, pomegranate, raspberry, rose, sandalwood, vanilla, violet, virginia cedar with tags , , , on March 4, 2015 by sorceressofthedark
Anna Sui Fairy Dance.

Anna Sui Fairy Dance.

A common complaint about Anna Sui perfumes is their longevity, it seems. Yes, there are other Anna Sui fragrances that disappear within a few hours on me, but Fairy Dance lasts longer.
The mandarin orange is crisp, bright and juicy, supported by the mango. The bamboo adds an interesting touch which I love, tempering it down with a scent of paper that holds your attention. If you’re not familiar with bamboo, it’s a clean-smelling note. Fairy Dance is also supported by the mustiness of vetiver nicely to create a fragrance that’s not all sickly sweet fruit. It moves on to a creamier scent as the vanilla kicks in, almost reminiscent of the old-fashioned Good Humor orange and vanilla ice cream bars, but not quite as sweet.
The bottle is chunky and the topper is a cute fairy sitting aloft and if you’re a collector, it’s a nice one to have. All in all, Fairy Dance surprised me as a tropical yet earthy fragrance with a fresh feel to it. I think it’s seasonless because of the bamboo/vetiver/vanilla notes. Daytime, sleeptime, it’s a comfortable floral fruity scent to wear. I truly enjoy this one.

Top Notes: Mandarin Orange, Pink Pepper, Mango.

Middle Notes: Bamboo, Rose, Peony.

Base Notes: Vetiver, Sandalwood, Vanilla.

Anna Sui Forbidden Affair.

Anna Sui Forbidden Affair.

If Only Anna Sui’s Forbidden Affair lived up to its’ name. This floral fruity perfume could have such promises. Black currant dominates, in other words, the infamous cat pee note, along with red currant (another cat pee note tempered with fruit), and lemon. Think about this. Not exactly pleasant. Along comes cedar and violets to give it an earthy dirt smell and there you have it. A Forbidden Affair with zombies. Enough said. Luckily it doesn’t last long.

Top Notes: Amalfi Lemon, Black Currant, Red Currant.

Middle Notes: Rose, Raspberry, Pomegranate.

Base Notes: Musk, Virginia Cedar, Violets, Vanilla.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

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Coty Styx…First Presented in 1911.

Posted in amber, bergamot, carnation, Coty Styx, Francois Coty, galbanum, incense, musk, oakmoss, orris root, patchouli, sandalwood, vanilla, violet, woodsy notes, ylang-ylang with tags , , , on February 7, 2015 by sorceressofthedark
Coty Styx.

Coty Styx.

Coty Styx from the 1940’s seemed like an interesting one to try. Imagine something from that far back? Perfumes from another era are quite different from today, that’s for sure. There is a definite wait and see, a travel through the perfume, a Journey if you will throughout the duration of it.

When I first applied it, morbid thoughts of a funeral home came to mind. The florals were that overwhelming to me. But then, a tobacco pipe, rich, full tobacco leaves and old leather that was well-cared for filled my senses. I felt as if I was sitting in a gentlemen’s club from days gone by. This was earthy, musky, intense and quite heavy. I could envision the haughty country club women that wore this back then-they were the ladies that wore furs, Fascinators and red lipstick. And that’s just the initial burst.

Once that passed,it became a warm, ambery sandalwood doused with vanilla a beautiful incense burning in the background. The vanilla was a sweet buttercream. It turned out absolutely delicious and cozy.

I just love how the old-timers take you on a trip. Francois Coty developed this perfume in 1911. It is no longer being produced. There is nothing similar to today’s perfumes in Coty’s Styx that you will find. It is a completely different beast. Should you find it, be prepared to experience what perfume originally was designed to be.

You can search auction sites, antique stores, collectible stores or thrift stores to try and locate Coty Styx.

Top Notes: Bergamot, Ylang-Ylang, Carnation, Galbanum.
Middle Notes: Violet, Orris, Incense.
Base Notes: Amber, Vanilla, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Musk, Woods, Oakmoss.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

Peace.

Sorceress.

 

Be Enchanted Perfume by Bath & Body Works.

Posted in Be Enchanted, blackberry, citruses, floral fruity, floral notes, honeysuckle, musk, passionfruit, pear, pomegranate, red berries, sandalwood, vanilla, violet with tags , , , , , , , on May 3, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Be Enchanted.

Be Enchanted.

Bath and Body Work’s Be Enchanted has one thing going for it. It’s name. That’s it.

I sprayed it on and was hit with the most overpowering grape gum smelling aroma blasting me that was so obnoxious even my dog walked away. I’m not kidding when I say this. She actually jumped off the couch and layed down five feet away from me, quite disgruntled.

Within ten minutes or so a sugary coating seemed to take over. If you can imagine sugar crystals on your arms, that’s exactly how I felt. As if I had a sugary sticky coating over the grape juice.

Then the headache increased steadily.

And I don’t get headaches from perfumes. If I don’t like them, if they are unpleasant, I simply wash them off. But Be Enchanted is a whole other ball game.

There is an overload of fruits and berries in this perfume that should satisfy anyone who desires this type of sweetish sour scent. Vanilla and a hint of sandalwood mix in ever so slightly but in no way take away from the chewing gum effect to give Be Enchanted the distinction of a fragrance of just another one of today’s popular sweet fruity presentations.

Shame on Bath & Body Works for continuing this type of product line while discontinuing their unique products that offered diversity in fragrances for all types of perfumistas. Instead, they seem hell-bent on retaining and constantly offering new sugary sweet run-of-the mill perfumes. They’re becoming a land of sheep, but let’s face it, that’s where the money is, and money is where the final decision is made.

Every perfume has its market and some have no market-they transcend all ages. Be Enchanted probably stays well in the very young market and would be an excellent gift choice for the that age group. Wearability is decent for this floral fruity and sillage is strong in the beginning but simmers down.

Top Notes: Citruses, Pomegranate, Red Berries, Passionfruit.

Middle Notes: Honeysuckle, Violet, Blackberry, Pear, Floral Notes.

Base Notes: Musk, Sandalwood, Vanilla.

Available at Bath & Body Works stores and online.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

 

Jean Arthes Perfumes.

Posted in amber, black currant, black tea, Boum For Women, Boum Green Tea Cherry Blossom, Boum Vanille Sa Pomme d'Amour, cedar, cherry blossom, floral fruity gourmand, freesia, Jean Arthes Perfumes, lemon, musk, orange, peach, pear, peony, praline, raspberry, red apple, rose, sandalwood, sugar cane, tea, vanilla, violet, wild strawberry with tags , , , , , on April 19, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Jeanne Arthes Perfumes.

Jeanne Arthes Perfumes.

Stumbling around my local Walgreens drugstore recently I discovered the line of Jeanne Arthes perfumes tucked away on a lower shelf in the cosmetics section of the store. There were only three of the line on display for testers and only three fragrances for sale. So disappointing, considering there are over a hundred listed in the databases.  Only three of the line for sale? What a selection.

The three available were Boum Vanille Sa Pomme d’Amour, Boum Green Tea Cherry Blossom and Boum for Women. I tested all three with relish. I was excited to have the opportunity to try out the Jeanne Arthes line of fragrances, even if it was only three fragrances.

Boum for women fell flat on its face for me. It’s supposed to be a floral-fruity, but frankly, it smelled quite synthetic without any distinguishable notes. I re-applied it heavily, but I could not distinguish the fruitiness from it and it still reminded me more of an aerosol room freshener than anything else.

I could imagine the Black Tea overtaking Cedar while the musk swirls around in a whirlwind masking the fruits. Hence, no distinguishable notes for me. More of an unequal blending that spits out as maybe this, maybe that with no prominence to it.

Boum’s Top Notes: Sugar Cane, Wild Strawberry, Black Tea.

Middle Notes: Peony, Violet, Freesia, Raspberry, Rose.

Base Notes: Sandalwood, Amber, Cedar, Musk.

Boum’s Green Tea Cherry Blossom offered little more in the way of fragrance but hardly enough to make me want to continue sniffing my arm. Again, this fragrance seems too linear, too flat and I wonder where this floral-fruity is going. Nowhere again.  No matter how hard I try, I can not pull out any citrus, musk, fruit or tea from this one. It’s a room deodorizer blend for a fragrance to my nose.

It seemed antiseptic in nature, very cold and not appealing. An associate had walked up to me to talk about the fragrances at this point, not realizing I had already sprayed all three. She picked up Green Tea Cherry Blossom and sprayed it at a two foot distance away from us. Then asked me if I could smell it. I have no idea why she sprayed it that way, other than she said it wasn’t very popular. I guess she didn’t want to take a chance on offending me with the spray. Not a way to make a sale, either.

Top Notes: Lemon, Tea, Pear.

Middle Notes: Rose, Black Currant, Cherry Blossom.

Base Notes: Musk, Peach.

The pleasant surprise awaited me with Boum Vanille Sa Pomme d’Amour. Now this one has some substance to it. As I sit here writing this seven hours later, I still can smell this enjoyable fragrance on my arm. Boum Vanille is definitely not for the faint of heart, either. It is sweet. Not necessarily candy-like sweet, although that’s the first impression.

When I first sprayed it, I thought candy apples. And I wondered how could anyone want to smell like a candy apple? But then within minutes the drydown began and I was pleasantly surprised. This perfume began to mellow down into a very pleasant cherry pipe tobacco type fragrance that is wonderful for the colder weather. The vanilla seems to sit inside the tobacco while the musk lends credence to this perfume’s solidarity. I can see myself wearing it when the weather turns brisk again next year, when snow begins to fall, and when the fireplace is going during the holidays. It’s that kind of perfume.

It lasts for hours, which for the price point of 9.99, is incredible. The bottle size is 3.4 oz with a cheesy little plastic sprayer that if you’re not too careful can easily pop off and break, so beware. But the juice inside is well worth it.

As a matter of fact, it reminds me very much of Royal Apothic Edwardian Fireplace. If you’re looking for a unisex scent that talks to you of a pipe tobacco, this is it, albeit packaged in pink. It’s not cloying at all. It can be strong depending on how it’s sprayed, but again, for the season, it’s a delight. Or, consider this a rainy day tobacco perfume. This floral-fruity certainly has it’s uses.

Top Note: Orange.

Middle Notes: Red Apple, Praline.

Base Notes: Musk, Vanilla.

Jeanne Arthes perfumes are available for testing at Walgreens drugstores, online at Walgreens, also online at various suppliers and through various auction sites.  Give them a sniff next time you’re out and about and see them.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

Reb’l Fleur by Rihanna … Sweet, Tart Muskiness That Lasts…And Surprises The Wearer.

Posted in amber, Caroline Sabas, coconut, hibiscus, musk, patchouli, peach, Perfumer's Noses, plum, Reb'l Fleur, red berries, tuberose, vanille, violet with tags , , , , , , on March 17, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Reb'l Fleur.

Reb’l Fleur.

Reb’l Fleur by Rihanna, the first of her forays into perfumery, launched in 2010. Considered a chypre floral, it is made in collaboration with perfumers Caroline Sabas and Marypierre Julien.

Caroline Sabas is the nose to work on such perfumes as A Rather Novel Collection Taverns & The Hague  by Caroline Sabas, Britney Spears Midnight Fantasy, Badgley Mischka Couture, Calvin Klein Downtown, Rihanna Rebelle,  Charles Jourdan The Parfum, Christian Audigier for Him, Faith Hill, Oud Orange Intense, Jennifer Lopez Glowing, Sunkissed Glow and Miami Glow, Fresh Cannabis Santal, Natori, Nicole Miller Frenzy, Shania Twain Shania Starlight, Sean John Unforgivable for Men, Kim Kardashian True Reflection and Ed Hardy for Women.

Marypierre Julien is the nose to work on such perfumes as A Rather Novel Collection Hamarikyu Gardens by Marypierre, Brooks Brothers Black Fleece Red Cologne, Brooks Brothers Black Fleece White Cologne, Christian Audigier For Women, Ed Hardy Skulls and Roses For Her, Ed Hardy Skulls and Roses For Him, Villain For Him, Elizabeth Arden 5th Avenue Nights, Gap Close, Happ and Stahns Rosa Alba 1842, Ivanka Trump For Women, Kate Walsh Boyfriend, Rihanna Rogue and Rebelle, Mariah Carey Vision of Love, Kate Walsh Billionaire Boyfriend, Six Scents Parfums Series 4. – 5-Second Skin-VPL & Marypierre Julien, and Banana Republic Wildbloom Rouge.

There is a tartness to this flanker of Rihannas I really enjoy. It’s both sweet and tart at the same time. The longevity is amazing. A few sprays are worth eight hours which is amazing for perfume, let alone those made today. Reb’ l Fleur by Rihanna has passed my strict tests and shown itself to be a winner in the fragrance category.

There seems to be a tropical flair with a fruity twist, like the infamous candy Wonka SweeTarts, but it’s wrapped in a musky haze. This doesn’t give Reb’l Fleur a childish or teen-set flair at all, rather, more of a unique twist for a perfume. Eventually, the musk thickens and a bit of buttered popcorn tuberose peeks through intermittently. The coconut and vanille mix in but don’t overwhelm to make this a purely linear vanilla cookie fragrance, either. Patchouli wraps it together nicely to make this scent an easy, comfortable perfume to wear anytime. All of the notes mix together well to create a perfume that dances and dips to give its wearer slight changes for interest.

Perfect for lounging on the week-ends, doing errands, relaxing, Reb’l Fleur is a feel-good fragrance that I’d say  can be worn through the four seasons. It radiates well with a few spritzes.

Speaking of the bottle-although looking at the flanker, one might think it’s nice and pretty and if you own all three of the series, (Rebelle, Reb’l Fleur and Nude), they are all identical except for the color of the banding around the bottle. They’d make a nice presentation on one’s vanity. However, when you try and spray them, it’s virtually impossible to do so with one hand. The base is so wide and the neckline is so slim, a human hand cannot physically hold it and spray it at the same time. I have to balance these bottles on something and then use another hand to spray them. The bottle design is the only detraction from Reb’l Fleur.  It’s absolutely horrible for use.

I bought my bottle of Reb’l Fleur, along with a body lotion and body wash on clearance for $12.50. It was a steal as far as I’m concerned since I absolutely adore this fragrance for the price. It’s one I’ll be reaching for often enough. Although reaching with two hands and it’s certainly not packable as a go-to in a travel bag.

The longevity is hours on end. For me, this perfume lasts at least eight hours before it starts to fade to a skin scent. That’s an incredibly long time. I love it as a day scent for a pick-me-up vibe.

Top Notes:  Peach, Plum, Red Berries.

Middle Notes: Tuberose, Violet, Coconut, Hibiscus.

Base Notes: Musk, Patchouli, Amber, Vanille.

You can find Reb’l Fleur in local department stores and online.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

 

Fashionista…Not For This Perfume….Why Do People Buy and Wear Those Things?

Posted in Fashionista, floral fruity gourmand, melon, peach, perfume notes, Perfumes, plum, spicy notes, violet, woodsy notes with tags , , , , on February 7, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Fashionista.

Fashionista.

What is the definition of “fashionista”? Many abound. Here are a few:

1. “A person who creates, promotes or follows the latest high fashion”.

2. “a person who designs, sells, or is very interested in clothing fashions”.

3.  “a designer of haute couture”, “a devoted follower of fashion”.

4.  “A term used to define a woman with a penchant for shopping and a natural flair for combining both current and vintage fashionable trends. In today’s Urban society, “fashionista” is not by any means a negative term. Thanks to television shows like “Sex and the City” rather more specifically, thanks to actresses such as Sarah Jessica Parker, the image of a “fashionista” has been modernized into a much more positive, powerful and successful feminine role. Forget the shallow, bitchy, materialistic image so many people are quick to describe. The truth is, it’s the new millenium and the hottest trend right now, is that it’s okay to be a woman again. The “fashionista” doesn’t look at her femininity as a gender flaw. Where some may be quick to label her a bitch, others actually take the time to get to know her eccentricities. “Fashionista’s” simply look at Fashion as an Art, their own bodies as the canvas, and the sense of style they develop along the way is simply the masterpiece. True fashion (“true fashion” as in the clothes and not the stereotypically thin supermodels that wear them) is simply an expression of identity and the people who feel the need to argue that are usually the same people who rarely see the positive in anything. “Fashionista’s” are extremely realistic when it comes to the world of fashion, they’re also very knowledgeable about the Fashion Arts. A person’s not automatically materialistic just because they buy a designer suit or expensive jeans, it’s often truer about “fashionista’s” that they just happen to know (what is called) a “good hand” in fashion. All that means is that the person buying the item is aware of the “quality” of that item.”Buying good quality clothes, that sort of fashion, is not shallow. It’s an investment. A fashionista thinks like this… Why pay five dollars for say, a white non-label t-shirt when it’s just going to shrink or the hem’s going to unravel or because it was only five dollars you don’t really care about throwing it into the wash with your reds? When you can buy a say, a thirty dollar white CK t-shirt that’s in all probability going to last a little longer, won’t unravel, and because it was thirty dollars you’ll actually care to read the “Care Tag” to see how you can better protect your investment (wash in hot water, with like colours, and most importantly HANG TO DRY)!”4

I like the fourth description of what “fashionista means. Protecting your investment, being aware of the quality of the item,  and being realistic. That’s where the name of Ellen Tracy’s perfume comes in . “Fashionista” is a misnomer. Someone pulled a name out of a hat that they knew would appeal to the masses and slapped it on the bottle. They literally slapped it on the bottle in the form of a plastic sticker. And they called this baby, “Fashionista”. Hoping that the name would sell the perfume. But the perfume stinks. As a matter of fact, the bottle label stinks, too. It’s crooked. It’s simply a plastic label slapped on. It looks cheap.

Fashionista is utterly horrible. I have always enjoyed Ellen Tracy’s offerings. Until this one. I already own four of her perfumes and enjoy them. When I saw this one, I bought it blind. Stupid mistake on my part. Very stupid mistake. (Thank goodness for return-policies.)

What does it smell like? Stale, spilled beer, perhaps. I could say regurgitated stale, spilled beer. This concoction is not good. Not at all. This is a chemical warfare mess that just reeks of putrid odors that would empty a house of suspected bad guys if thrown in the windows instead of smoke bombs. It’s that choking.

The ghastly pollution that emanated from my skin after application of Fashionista can only be accounted for by a few things. One: This is truly one of the worst perfume mixes on the market today. Two: I happened to get a “bad” bottle. I’d like others to weigh in on their opinion of Fashionista to see if they really enjoy this perfume and leave their comments.

I can’t give you any other description of notes because for me, there weren’t any. The fragrance was pure synthetic chemicals that for me, did smell absolutely horrible.

This floral-fruity was launched in 2011 and can be found in department stores like TJMaxx, Marshalls and Ross or online.

Top Notes: Citrus, Melon, Peach, Plum.

Middle Notes: Violet, Mimose, Orange Blossom.

Base Notes: Spicy Notes, Woody Notes.

Peace.

Sorceress.

Footnotes: 1.) Wordweb; 2.) Merriam-Webster; 3.) Oxford Dictionary; 4.) urban Dictionary.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

Nirvana Black and White by Elizabeth and James…Why Do People Buy and Wear Those Things?

Posted in Elizabeth and James Nirvana Black, lily-of-the-valley, musk, peony, sandalwood, vanilla, violet with tags , , , , , , , on February 1, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Elizabeth and James Nirvana.

Elizabeth and James Nirvana. (Photos courtesy of Sephora site.)

I recently tested Nirvana Black and Nirvana White. No, no, not for me. Not either of them. Let me explain.

Nirvana Black comes across as pure pepper. Very strong pepper hit me immediately and stayed throughout the life of this perfume. It never diminished. A wash of sandalwood envelops the peppery sense as if it’s framing it solidly. Here’s the problem. The sandalwood smells synthetic. It’s not woody. It’s not natural. It doesn’t bring any pleasant images.  On top of that, the pepper stings. It bites.

As two lonely prominent notes, they’re headache inducing.  Unfortunately, in Nirvana Black, they were the only two notes that surfaced.

It was suggested to me to at Sephora to layer Nirvana Black and Nirvana White. I did. I tried the suggestion. Now, bear in mind the cost of this suggestion. Even at the cost of the rollerballs which are $22 apiece, that would be layering $44 worth of perfume, just to make Nirvana Black better.

Frankly, it only made it worse. Nirvana Black is far stronger and overpowers Nirvana White, which is an in your face blast of a floral. Peony is the main note and it hits you full frontal in White. As in Black, White has the power to smell synthetic.

So what did Nirvana Black really remind me of? Walking down the laminate plastic aisle at Home Depot. That’s my mental image when I smell my hand, my wrist, and where I sprayed this perfume. These are not people-pleasers. At least not to me.

On the up side, they lasted for five hours, that’s at least the point that I decided to wash them off. So longevity is wonderful. After the initial blast, which is rather strong, they do sit close to the skin. Nirvana Black seems more suitable for shopping in the winter-time in any home-remodeling store and Nirvana White just comes across more as a floral room spray.

Both are listed as unisex fragrances, but they didn’t seem masculine nor feminine to me. Probably because of the more synthetic feel to them, I couldn’t nor I wouldn’t classify them as either type of fragrance.

These two perfumes are encased in a rather chic container, stylish and sleek. Actually visually pleasing and different. It’s the one aspect of the perfume I did like.

Nirvana Black Notes: Violet, Sandalwood, Vanilla.

Nirvana White Notes: Peony, Musk, Lily-Of-The-Valley.

Nirvana White is considered a floral woody musk, while Nirvana Black is considered a woody perfume. The 1.7 oz. Eau de Parfum spray is available for $75.00, the 1 oz. Eau de Parfum spray is $55.00, and the .34 oz. roller ball is $22.00, all available at Sephora. See Elizabeth and James Nirvana perfumes at Sephora here: http://www.sephora.com/elizabeth-james?brandId=7028&ref=2111028.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

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