Archive for the sandalwood Category

Anna Sui Perfumes.

Posted in almalfi lemon, bamboo, black currant, floral fruity, mandarin orange, musk, peony, pink pepper, pomegranate, raspberry, rose, sandalwood, vanilla, violet, virginia cedar with tags , , , on March 4, 2015 by sorceressofthedark
Anna Sui Fairy Dance.

Anna Sui Fairy Dance.

A common complaint about Anna Sui perfumes is their longevity, it seems. Yes, there are other Anna Sui fragrances that disappear within a few hours on me, but Fairy Dance lasts longer.
The mandarin orange is crisp, bright and juicy, supported by the mango. The bamboo adds an interesting touch which I love, tempering it down with a scent of paper that holds your attention. If you’re not familiar with bamboo, it’s a clean-smelling note. Fairy Dance is also supported by the mustiness of vetiver nicely to create a fragrance that’s not all sickly sweet fruit. It moves on to a creamier scent as the vanilla kicks in, almost reminiscent of the old-fashioned Good Humor orange and vanilla ice cream bars, but not quite as sweet.
The bottle is chunky and the topper is a cute fairy sitting aloft and if you’re a collector, it’s a nice one to have. All in all, Fairy Dance surprised me as a tropical yet earthy fragrance with a fresh feel to it. I think it’s seasonless because of the bamboo/vetiver/vanilla notes. Daytime, sleeptime, it’s a comfortable floral fruity scent to wear. I truly enjoy this one.

Top Notes: Mandarin Orange, Pink Pepper, Mango.

Middle Notes: Bamboo, Rose, Peony.

Base Notes: Vetiver, Sandalwood, Vanilla.

Anna Sui Forbidden Affair.

Anna Sui Forbidden Affair.

If Only Anna Sui’s Forbidden Affair lived up to its’ name. This floral fruity perfume could have such promises. Black currant dominates, in other words, the infamous cat pee note, along with red currant (another cat pee note tempered with fruit), and lemon. Think about this. Not exactly pleasant. Along comes cedar and violets to give it an earthy dirt smell and there you have it. A Forbidden Affair with zombies. Enough said. Luckily it doesn’t last long.

Top Notes: Amalfi Lemon, Black Currant, Red Currant.

Middle Notes: Rose, Raspberry, Pomegranate.

Base Notes: Musk, Virginia Cedar, Violets, Vanilla.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

Coty Styx…First Presented in 1911.

Posted in amber, bergamot, carnation, Coty Styx, Francois Coty, galbanum, incense, musk, oakmoss, orris root, patchouli, sandalwood, vanilla, violet, woodsy notes, ylang-ylang with tags , , , on February 7, 2015 by sorceressofthedark
Coty Styx.

Coty Styx.

Coty Styx from the 1940’s seemed like an interesting one to try. Imagine something from that far back? Perfumes from another era are quite different from today, that’s for sure. There is a definite wait and see, a travel through the perfume, a Journey if you will throughout the duration of it.

When I first applied it, morbid thoughts of a funeral home came to mind. The florals were that overwhelming to me. But then, a tobacco pipe, rich, full tobacco leaves and old leather that was well-cared for filled my senses. I felt as if I was sitting in a gentlemen’s club from days gone by. This was earthy, musky, intense and quite heavy. I could envision the haughty country club women that wore this back then-they were the ladies that wore furs, Fascinators and red lipstick. And that’s just the initial burst.

Once that passed,it became a warm, ambery sandalwood doused with vanilla a beautiful incense burning in the background. The vanilla was a sweet buttercream. It turned out absolutely delicious and cozy.

I just love how the old-timers take you on a trip. Francois Coty developed this perfume in 1911. It is no longer being produced. There is nothing similar to today’s perfumes in Coty’s Styx that you will find. It is a completely different beast. Should you find it, be prepared to experience what perfume originally was designed to be.

You can search auction sites, antique stores, collectible stores or thrift stores to try and locate Coty Styx.

Top Notes: Bergamot, Ylang-Ylang, Carnation, Galbanum.
Middle Notes: Violet, Orris, Incense.
Base Notes: Amber, Vanilla, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Musk, Woods, Oakmoss.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

Peace.

Sorceress.

 

Nicole Richie No Rules.

Posted in almond blossom, coconut, floral fruity, frangipani, jasmine, kumquat, musk, Nicole Richie No Rules, orange blossom, sandalwood, vanilla, wild berries with tags , , , , on February 5, 2015 by sorceressofthedark
Nicole Richie No Rules.

Nicole Richie No Rules.

I enjoyed Nicole Richie’s first offering into the perfume world simply called “Nicole” so much that I didn’t hesitate purchasing her second. The price I paid was very low so frankly, I wasn’t out that much. (Thanks to TJMaxx, a local discounter in the USA).

No Rules smells delicious too, the flacon is pretty, altho not as pretty as the first, it’s actually quite a simple bottle and strikingly similar to the first with the identical bottle cap. The box, I dare say, is prettier than the bottle. However, the juice inside just doesn’t last long at all. Maybe two hours and that’s a stretch using body lotion to make sure your skin is well nourished. It’s a great perfume to take to sleep and scent your linens.

This is a sweet, candied, sunny perfume. Orange blossom and kumquat top it off with a sparkling, effervescent beginning. Frangipani brings in a flowery essence and its’ drydown is a skin musk with a mild vanilla.

No Rules is a fantasy-like perfume, likened to fairies and their playfulness in the woods, campfires and forests, dark colder nights when the wind stings your face and turns your cheeks red. It’s earthy and whimsical really, not a perfume to be taken seriously. It’s great for bed-time when you want to relax and scent your linens to de-stress.

This floral fruity arrived in 2014 and is available in discount stores and online.

Top Notes: Orange Blossom, Kumquat, Wild Berries, Almond Blossom.

Middle Notes: Frangipani, Jasmine, Coconut.

Base Notes: Sandalwood, Vanilla, Musk.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

Elsa Schiaparelli Shocking. Animalistic Perfume From Days Gone By.

Posted in aldehydes, amber, bergamot, civetta, clove, jasmine, Jean Carles, musk, narcissus, patchouli, rose, sandalwood, Shocking, tarragon, white honey, ylang-ylang with tags , , , , , , on January 30, 2015 by sorceressofthedark

 

Shocking Schiaparelli.

Shocking Schiaparelli.

I recently came across a vintage sample of Shocking Schiaparelli by Elsa Schiaparelli, an oriental floral fragrance developed in 1937. I have no idea what year my sample vial is from, but it is older. Here are my thoughts on Shocking.

Initially, I believed this to be a beautiful perfume. After wearing it for hours, I still believe it would be considered beautiful by some, but others would have a problem with a fragrance such as this. Let me explain. It’s thick, rich and grand without a doubt. Civet comes to the forefront with a heavy dose of musk.

But civet isn’t for everyone. Civet is the by-product of the anal glands of exotic civet cats. In vintage perfumes, it was actually taken from the glands of the caged animal. Today, it is reproduced synthetically for ethical reasons. To some, it is considered a repulsive scent. To others, it adds beauty to a perfume.

Other well known perfumes that contain civet are Chanel No. 5, Shalimar, Coco Chanel, Jean Patou’s Joy, Kouros, Obsession, Paloma Picasso, Ysatis, Magie Noire, My Sin, Tabu, Bandit, Knowing, Elizabeth Taylor’s Passion, Cabotine Gres, Gloria Vanderbilt, Avon’s Occur and Topaze, Paul Sebastian Design, Krazy Krizia and White Shoulders.

Skanky? Yes. Shocking? Nah. Just in the sense of smelling of well, not necessarily sexy, but sexed. And there is a difference in those words. Some use the word “naughty” in their description, but that just sounds so tame to me. Shocking is an animalistic perfume that serves its purpose for certain occasions and those personalities that can pull it off.

It’s strong, a little goes a long way. I can only imagine how too much would clear a room. This is a perfume that needs to only be dabbed. It’s not an office perfume.

Shocking continues on a linear road for me, never really riding any waves or changing mid-course. I can see its’ appeal for vintage lovers and it’s a definite try for history perfume buffs. I’m happy for the opportunity to have sampled Jean Carles perfume.

Top Notes: Bergamot, Tarragon, Aldehydes.

Middle Notes: Narcissus, Jasmine, Ylang-Ylang, White Honey, Rose.

Base Notes: Musk, Sandalwood, Patchouli, Amber, Clove, Civetta.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

Avril Lavigne Forbidden Rose…Not A Rose At All.

Posted in Avril Lavigne Forbidden Rose, floral fruity gourmand, Granny Smith apple, heliotrope, lotus, Mexican Chocolate, peach, pepper, Perfumes, red apple, sandalwood, vanille with tags , , , , on December 8, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Avril Lavigne Forbidden Rose.

Avril Lavigne Forbidden Rose.

Chocolate-vanilla-and more of a cedar-type wood rather than a sandalwood. Those are the three notes I get when I spray and they stay with me the duration of Forbidden Rose. Which is rather nice, it’s a different scent to reach for in the cooler months when I am feeling in a tougher mood, ready to take on anyone, anything. That’s the implication of this perfume.

I love the mix of chocolate and vanilla at the same time without this perfume being too much of a sweet gourmand. Because it’s not at all. The wood brings it down to a mature level and adds an interesting thought to what could have been a generic ice cream cone. Forbidden Rose is not sweetness personified, rather, it hints of a masculine scent as time goes on. It is a scent that sits closer to you depending on how you spray.

It’s also in the category of another unisex fragrance, wavering on the brink of his and hers, although the bottle is definitely more feminine with its’ black rose topper, purple juice inside (my bottle has clear glass) and a barbed wire ring (think Pam Anderson’s ink) that comes off the top to wear that’s a size 7 1/4. The stem inside is black adding to it’s well-thought design.

It’s really a surprise scent, one that you would not expect a femme fatale to wear, but if one does, I’d imagine she’d be causing a bit of trouble. It reminds me more of a grunge era or a biker-chick attitude scent without a doubt with its’ huge overtones of woods and pepper blended so seamlessly layered over vanilla and chocolate.

I do enjoy its’ beginning creaminess. I also like that it segues into a completely different fume. Great for cool, rainy, foggy days wearing moto jackets into the night mist.

This isn’t a rose scent at all, so if you’re looking for roses, look elsewhere. It’s classified as a floral fruity gourmand, which is quite the mouthful. I found my bottle locally at TJMaxx discounted for $7.99 and for that price, it was a steal.

Top Notes: Peach, Red Apple, Pepper.

Middle Notes: Lotus, Heliotrope, Granny Smith Apple.

Base Notes: Vanille, Mexican Chocolate, Sandalwood.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

 

Tuvache Jungle Gardenia.

Posted in benzoin, Bitter orange, clary sage, cyclamen, gardenia, heliotrope, jasmine, lily-of-the-valley, musk, oakmoss, sandalwood, tarragon, tuberose, Tuvache Jungle Gardenia, violet leaf, ylang-ylang with tags , , , , , , on December 8, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Tuvache Jungle Gardenia.

Tuvache Jungle Gardenia.

I recently acquired a vintage three-piece set of Jungle Gardenia by Tuvache, which included the cologne, perfumed powder and cologne spray concentrate. The original store sticker on this set, still on, priced it at $16.50, pretty hefty for the time period of this box, circa 1960’s. An inflation calculator puts that price at roughly $123.24 today, so it wasn’t that cheap.

Tuvache began producing Jungle Gardenia in 1932. They were a New York Company that used a french name to compete in the industry with many pre-World War II French fragrances controlling the current perfume industry. If you recognize the name, it’s because Madame Tuvache is a character in Gustave Glabert’s French novel, Madame Bovary.

Those rumored to wear Jungle Gardenia were Hollywood notobles Annette Funicello, Joan Crawford, Natalie Wood, Elizabeth Taylor and Fay Wray who wore it while filming King Kong. Michael Jackson also was a fan of this perfume. Perhaps because of his friendship with Elizabeth Taylor, speculation guesses.

The original Tuvache company was sold in the late 1960’s to Germaine Monteil, then in the 1970’s to Yardley of London, in 1989 to the Jovan division of Coty. A new reformulated scent was created that was not as popular as the original perfume.

Jungle Gardenia begins with gardenia of course, straight up. But, there is a burnt flavoring covering the top for some brief moments, perhaps it’s the clary sage in passing while the tart bitterness of the orange mellows the gardenia.  The tuberose at times is overpowering. It’s strong, thick and pure. It wafts in, around and through the perfume.

Eventually, Jungle Gardenia turned into a spicier sandlewood many, many hours later. Not just a generic sandlewood, mind you, but one that I’ve not encountered in a long, long time. Woods wrapped in types of unique spices and this stage was still just as strong as the others. To me, this seems a cold weather perfume to wear sparingly, but I haven’t tried it in the warmer months. I’d be curious to see how it develops then.

I loved how Jungle Gardenia took me through a Journey of notes and hours of pleasure of a perfume. That’s what it’s all about. Or how perfume used to be developed. And how it used to develop on those that spritzed them on themselves. They could enjoy the fragrance for hours.

This oriental floral perfume is clean, bright and fresh. It’s mature, sultry and strong. It’s a fragrance from the past that’s heady and strong-willed. a perfume to wear in the evening, for a mature personality that knows the old-time perfumes and appreciates them. What a delightful find this perfume has been!

Top Notes: Bitter Orange, Clary Sage, Cyclamen, Heliotrope.

Middle Notes: Gardenia, Tuberose, Tarragon, Ylang-Ylang, Violet Leaf, Jasmine, Lily-Of-The-Valley.

Base Notes: Oakmoss, Benzoin, Sandalwood, Musk.

Peace.

Sorceress

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

 

White Diamonds Perfume…Stand Apart From The Crowd.

Posted in aldehydes, amber, bergamot, carnation, cinnamon, Egyptian Tuberose, Elizabeth Taylor, floral aldehyde, Italian Orris Root, jasmine, lily, musk, narcissus, neroli, oakmoss, orange, patchouli, sandalwood, Turkish Rose, White Diamonds, ylang-ylang with tags , , , , , , on May 27, 2014 by sorceressofthedark
Elizabeth Taylor's White Diamonds.

Elizabeth Taylor’s White Diamonds.

A multitude of flowers, tempered by creamy Egyptian Tuberose immediately brings to mind a bath of scented oils. White Diamonds reminds me of the strong power fragrances of the ’80’s-ladies who wore suits with shoulder pads, short skirts, high heels and big hair and weren’t afraid to say no, because they knew who they were, what they wanted and where they were going. Oh, how I remember those days!


I recently met a woman in the fragrance department of a store who told she only wore this perfume and was constantly on the look-out for others to no avail. We had a lively discussion over the old-time perfumes and I suggested some new ones for her to try. We parted happily after our discussion, two mature women, of  eras passed, where perfumes were once delicate and feminine, then turned to a heavier insidious oilier vibe-the musks, the patchoulis, the vetivers, then on to the powerhouses of the ’80s’.

We’ve enjoyed our true gourmands, our real vanillas, our basics. But now we see the insipid fruity blends. The mixes that are the flash-in-the-pans, the slap their names on and call a designer perfume. And we wonder what will become of this younger generation when they mature? What will be their baseline to cull information from?


Not so with Elizabeth Taylor’s White Diamonds. The aldehydes, of course, immediately hit you, but so does the bergamot, taming the bright florals of lily, carnation, jasmine, and ylang-ylang. But you expect this. The citrus of neroli, violety resemblance of orris root, light spices of cinnamon, hints of Turkish Rose, the hypnotic headiness of narcissus are all blended so well it’s no wonder this fragrance is becoming a classic. Amber powders the mix well, while the oakmoss and patchouli give it its mysterious undercurrent. A light musk and a bare inkling of sandalwood all combine to make White Diamonds a perfume definitive unlike any you’ll smell and one you’ll always remember. This is a love/hate relationship perfume. It is for the experienced wearer, for the lover of perfumes that understands and appreciates the correlation of notes as they are applied.

 
Slapping her sobriquet on a bottle wouldn’t have made Liz happy. She needed to make the perfumes work. She was successful in her goals. As with all of her fragrances, sillage is strong, as is the longevity. There is so much going on from start to finish, it is a joy to experience. This is a daytime or nighttime fragrance to wear, one to make you feel and experience strength.


I can understand falling in love with this perfume, and why someone would make it their signature perfume. It is complex. It’s warm and surrounding. There are quite a few in the Elizabeth Taylor line to sample, and if you have the opportunity, give as many as you can a test. They are fascinating perfumes.

So who can really wear this perfume? Are you too young to wear it? Is it only for the more mature wearer? It’s for a person who truly appreciates fragrances. It’s a perfume for someone who is ageless and classic, a daring soul who really doesn’t give a damn about what advertisements are telling society to wear today. It’s for the person that wants a lingering scent with gusto that wants to be remembered and wants to stand apart from the crowd. It’s price point is user friendly today as is most of her line and that’s what Elizabeth Taylor wanted. She wanted her perfumes to be used by all, not a select few.

White Diamonds, a floral aldehyde,  is available as an Eau de Toilette and Eau de Parfum with accompanying lotions and shower gels. They are available in major department stores, Sephora, discount department stores and online.’

Top Notes: Aldehydes, Orange, Lily, Neroli, Bergamot.

Middle Notes: Italian Orris Root, Carnation, Cinnamon, Egyptian Tuberose, Jasmine, Turkish Rose, Ylang-Ylang, Narcissus.

Base Notes: Amber, Patchouli, Musk, Oakmoss, Sandalwood.

Peace.

Sorceress.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

 

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