Patchouli and Hippies? Why Do People Buy and Wear Those Things?

Patchouli Plant.

Patchouli Plant.

I love reading perfume reviews. And I always save the reviews at Parfumo for last when I’m using them for my research in a purchase. Why? Because the reviews there are the most poignant and honest reviews that delve into a perfume.

When I’m researching perfumes to buy, I first read the notes (obviously), then I’ll read reviews about the perfume. I’ll be honest. I go to different sites. At another site, I have to scroll through ( a lot) of reviews to find the worthwhile ones that have relevant material. That’s ok. I’m a fast reader.

And some of them do make me smile. Or laugh. Or guffaw. I try not to drink anything while reading them at the other site.

I’m a patch lover. Not everyone is. Again, that’s ok. Sometimes, a reviewer will comment that a perfume would have been great if only patchouli wasn’t in the mix, because the patchouli ruined it. Well, here’s my thought on that. Why’d you try that perfume if you knew patchouli was in it, and you knew you hated patchouli? Of course you’re going to hate it. Duh. The perfumer didn’t ask for your opinion. Did you bother to read the notes beforehand? Guess not.

Or this type of comment opens my eyes all the time. And I see it often enough. A reviewer will comment about patchouli in a good way, saying that it’s not a patchouli that dirty hippies would wear, or a patch that reminds them of smelly hippies. Passive-aggressive shot at hippies.

So then I’ll look at the reviewer to check their age. And bingo! They’re a youngin, far too young to have been rollin’ in the mud at Woodstock. So I wonder. Were their parents traumatized by some hippies? Were their parents hippie-wannabes? Did hippies kidnap them at an early age and try to help them evolve into peaceful people? What happened in their early development stages that they dislike an entire generation of people that they know nothing about? Did these people grow up hearing about hippies in such a negative way that they must always associate hippies with patchouli, dirtiness and some type of disgusting odor? Who influenced them to speak so negatively and become haters of hippies? They weren’t there, and that type of comment doesn’t belong in a review, just as the “old lady smelling perfume” comment doesn’t belong in a review, either.

Thank goodness I don’t see it at Parfumo. Because it doesn’t belong in a critique. And for the record? I don’t remember a dirty, hippie smell from back in the day. I do remember a lot of smiles, peace signs, hugs and camaraderie. Oh yeah-and people smelling of patch, musk oil, cannabis and hashish. There were bad times (the war) and good times back then. No need to dismiss and become haters of a generation of people that attempted to make changes for themselves and future generations.

I wish folks would keep their dismissive tones of society out of reviews. It just shows their ignorance.

Of course, marketing always comes into play. I’ve added pictures of current perfumes from fragrances of patchouli/patchouli types of today. Note the marketing hype. Is it any wonder where the phrases “dirty hippie” come from? Granted, there will always be sociological implications, we know this. Those are ingrained. But to implement ad campaigns directed at a group of people and market perfumes using these words is just wrong. And this is called creativity? What and who could be next?

Frankly, I wouldn’t put my money down to any company that markets anything like this that isn’t creative and dismisses a group of people in a hateful way. It’s slanderous.

"Dirty Dreaded Hippie".

“Dirty Dreaded Hippie”.

“Dirty Dreaded Hippie” Oil ,made by a company called Wicked Soaps, contains patchouli oil.

"Hippie Stench".

“Hippie Stench”.

Hippie Stench patchouli cream perfume, marketed by bubble genius,  claims  “Our earth mother hippie friends begged and begged us, so we formulated this patchouli-heavy fragrance for them, and they loooove us for it. We just wish they wouldn’t hug us so much.” Don’t they love hugs? Must be anal-retentive. Or the stench from their “Hippie Stench” patchouli cream perfume. Or so it says.

There’s more, but then I’d be advertising them, and I won’t do that. They don’t deserve it.

Here’s a list of some real patchouli perfumes that you might find interesting to research.

1. Chambre Noire by Olfactive Studio.

2. Angel by Thierry Mugler.

2. Pulse NYC by Beyonce

3. True Reflections by Kim Kardashian

4. Polo Club Sexy by Polo Club Beverly Hills

5. White Patchouli by Tom Ford

6. Dust by Demeter Fragrance

7. Patchouly by Profumum Roma

8. Patchouly by Etro

9.Coromandel by Chanel

10.Heritage by Guerlain

11. Amber Pour Homme Intense by Prada

12. Si Lolita by Lolita Lempicka

13. L’Encroyable Patchouli by Reminiscence

14. Midnight Poison by Dior

15. Miss Dior 2005 by Dior

16.  Kenzo Amour Le Parfum by Kenzo

17. Calamity J. by Juliette Has A Gun

18. Zen by Shiseido

19. Id by Medittorosa

20. Real Patchouly by Bois 1920

21. A-Men by Thierry Mugler

22. Habit Rouge by Guerlain

23. Noir by Tom Ford

24. Karma /Gorilla Perfume at Lush/Karma by Lush

25. Patchouli by The Body Shop

26. H & M Comme des Garcons

27. DKNY Be Delicious Red

28. Cuba City New York For Women

29. Patchouli Empire CB I Hate Perfume

30. Let It Rock by Vivienne Westwood

31. Excess Tokyo Milk

32. Believe by Britney Spears

33. Bull’s Blood by Imaginary Authors

34. F for Fascinating by Salvatore Ferragamo

35. Fancy Nights by Jessica Simpson.

I’ll just go enjoy me some good ole patch perfume right now. Time to spritz some on.

Peace.

Sorceress.

Patchouli Plant photo from Hirt’s Gardens. You can order one here: http://www.hirts.com/Fragrant-Patchouli-Plant-Perfume-Pogostemon/dp/B000ND39K2?traffic_src=froogle&utm_medium=organic&utm_source=froogle&gclid=CIP7udCX9bwCFfM7Ogodxy4AaQ.

All works past, present and future are protected under a CCC. Creative Common License, Kaarie Blake Musings by Kaarie Blake is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-Noderivs-3.0-Unported License.

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2 Responses to “Patchouli and Hippies? Why Do People Buy and Wear Those Things?”

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